INGREDIENTS

SUKUMO

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Tie-Dye is a primitive dyeing technique found in many parts of the world. In this technique, fabric is tied, twisted, or sewn before dying, resulting in dye-resistant sections. These bound areas retain their natural color, creating unique tie-dye patterns.

 

藍の乾燥葉を4ヶ月ほどかけて発酵させたもの。

AKU : Lye(Wood Ash Water)

灰汁
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In Itajime, fabric is tightly compressed between wooden boards. Due to the high pressure, dye-resistant areas are created, which then create patterns after dyeing. From bold patterns to geometrical repetitions, many forms of expression are possible based on the method of folding the fabric.

 

ウバメガシなど硬い広葉樹の灰に、熱湯を加えて数日おいた上澄み液。1回目にとった液を1番灰汁、2回目を2番灰汁。強アルカリ性。

KAIBAI : Shell Powder(Ash)

貝灰

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In Roketsu-zome (Japanese), or Batik, wax is heated and melted, then applied to fabric by brush or other means to create dye-resistant areas. After dyeing, hot water is poured over the fabric, melting the wax and revealing the design. In our studio we primarily use a brush for application, but have other various tools as well, such as the traditional Indonesian Batik tool, the Canting.

カキやハマグリなどの貝殻を焼いてできる灰。強アルカリ性。pH調整に使う。

FUSUMA : Wheat Bran

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Using a stencil, rice glue (created from sweet rice flour and rice bran) is set over the fabric and dried. Then, multiple applications of dye are applied carefully to ensure the rice glue does not lose form. After dyeing, the glue is washed off and the stenciled pattern is revealed. At BUAISOU, both western stencil methods and traditional Japanese Shibugami (paper plastered with Persimmon tannin) stenciling are used.

 

小麦を製粉した時に出る皮、糠。でんぷん質、糖分が菌の栄養源。